Dr. Tanoy Bose

MD (General Medicine), Chief Clinical Co-ordinator MRCP Ireland
Interventional Rheumatologist and Immunologist
Member of Association of Physicians of India (API)
Member of Indian Rheumatology Association (IRA)

 

+91 98300 36277 / +91 98313 36275


drtanoybose@gmail.com
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Ankylosing Spondylitis
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Osteoarthritis
Chronic Neck Pain
Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Total Knee Replacement
Fibromyalgia
Bursitis
Gout
Juvenile Chronic Arthritis
S.L.E
Low Back Pain
Osteoporosis
Sjogrens Syndrome
Psoriatic Arthritis
Frozen Shoulder
 

Osteoporosis

 
Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and brittle so brittle that a fall or even mild stresses such as bending over or coughing can cause a fracture. Osteoporosis-related fractures most commonly occur in the hip, wrist or spine.

Bone is living tissue that is constantly being broken down and replaced. Osteoporosis occurs when the creation of new bone doesn't keep up with the removal of old bone.

Osteoporosis affects men and women of all races. But white and Asian women especially older women who are past menopause are at highest risk. Medications, healthy diet and weight-bearing exercise can help prevent bone loss or strengthen already weak bones.



Causes of Osteoporosis?


Osteoporosis Your bones are in a constant state of renewal new bone is made and old bone is broken down. When you're young, your body makes new bone faster than it breaks down old bone and your bone mass increases. Most people reach their peak bone mass by their early 20s. As people age, bone mass is lost faster than it's created.

How likely you are to develop osteoporosis depends partly on how much bone mass you attained in your youth. The higher your peak bone mass, the more bone you have "in the bank" and the less likely you are to develop osteoporosis as you age.



Symptoms of Osteoporosis?


Osteoporosis

There typically are no symptoms in the early stages of bone loss. But once your bones have been weakened by osteoporosis, you may have signs and symptoms that include:

• Back pain, caused by a fractured or collapsed vertebra
• Loss of height over time
• A stooped posture
• A bone fracture that occurs much more easily than expected

 
 
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CONDITION TREATED

Ankylosing Spondylitis | Rheumatoid Arthritis | Osteoarthritis | Chronic Neck Pain | Antiphospholipid Syndrome | Total Knee Replacement | Fibromyalgia | Bursitis | Gout | Juvenile Chronic Arthritis | S.L.E | Low Back Pain | Osteoporosis | Sjogrens Syndrome | Psoriatic Arthritis | Frozen Shoulder >
 
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